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by Chris Kick

Wednesday, August 25, 2010



REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio — The leader of the nation’s largest animal welfare organization has pledged his support for the newly created Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board.






In an Aug. 24 meeting at the Ohio Department of Agriculture in Reynoldsburg, The Humane Society of the United States CEO Wayne Pacelle told board members he upholds the ballot decision Ohioans approved last fall calling for the board’s formation, and its charge to set standards of welfare for farm animals.



 

“We recognize the vote of the citizens of Ohio on Issue 2, and we recognize the authority of the livestock board,” Pacelle said during the board’s public comment period.



 

The board is the first of its kind in the nation and was approved with nearly a two-thirds vote. He called it “a novel structure to address an increasingly complex set of issues. It’s not just animal welfare, it’s production, it’s environment...

Last Updated (Friday, 27 August 2010 00:54)

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Compromise on animal welfare may hurt outside investment

By Ben Sutherly, Staff Writer Updated 1:59 AM Sunday, July 25, 2010

Ohio’s egg and hog industries, which together generated more than $1 billion in sales in 2008, recently negotiated compromises with the Humane Society of the United States on controversial housing practices for farm animals.

The agreement, reached behind closed doors in late June and brokered by Gov. Ted Strickland, headed off a potentially nasty battle leading up to the November elections that both sides said could have cost millions of dollars and bruised agriculture’s public image.

The deal, if implemented, isn’t expected to have much impact on what consumers pay for pork and eggs. But some fear it could discourage outside investment in Ohio’s hog and egg industries.

The recommendations, for example, throw another roadblock in front of state permits that would create Ohio’s largest single egg farm, Hi-Q Egg Products LLC, in Union County. The...

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In the latest issue of All Animals magazine, author David Kirby describes the health and environmental problems caused by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and the fight against industrial animal production in rural America

All Animals magazine, July/August 2010

Editor's note: David Kirby's Animal Factory: The Looming Threat of Industrial Pig, Dairy, and Poultry Farms to Humans and the Environment was published in March by St. Martin's Press. He also wrote the award-winning New York Times bestseller Evidence of Harm: Mercury in Vaccines and the Autism Epidemic—A Medical Controversy (St. Martin's Press, 2005). A journalist for more than 15 years, he has appeared on numerous television and radio programs and is a contributor to The Huffington Post.

by David KirbyPrologue



They've been threatened with lawsuits, and with their lives. They've been shunned at church meetings and labeled anti-farm terrorists by Big Ag operators. But they never, ever give up.

For...

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20 July 2010 by Bob Holmes

Magazine issue 2769. Subscribe and save

For similar stories, visit the Food and Drink Topic Guide

IF YOU'RE a typical westerner, you ate nearly 100 kilograms of meat last year. This was almost certainly the costliest part of your diet, especially in environmental terms. The clamour for people to eat less meat to save the planet is growing ever louder. "Less meat = less heat", proclaimed Paul McCartney in the run-up to last December's conference on global warming in Copenhagen. And this magazine recently recommended eating less meat as a way to reduce our environmental footprint.

If less is good, wouldn't none be better? You might think so. "In the developed world, the most effective way to reduce the environmental impact of diet, on a personal basis, is to become vegetarian or vegan," says Annette Pinner, chief executive of the Vegetarian Society in the UK.

It seems like a no-brainer, but is it really that simple? To find out, let's imagine what...

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By Rita Jane Gabbett on 7/14/2010

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed legislation this week expanding the responsibilities of the Advisory Board of Livestock Commissioners in order to ensure the well-being of poultry and domestic animals.

“It is important that all animals – from household pets to livestock – are treated in a manner that is ethical and humane, and this bill is an important measure to ensure just that,” Quinn said in a news release.

Under Illinois Senate Bill 3604, effective immediately, the Advisory Board of Livestock Commissioners will be responsible for approving...

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